5 Strength Defying Uses for Super Glue

October 28, 2016 by Super Glue Corp Leave a reply »
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While super glue can be a great tool to use around the house for those DIY projects, most people don’t know just how strong this adhesive really is. In fact, time and time again, super glue has been proven to be one of the strongest available bonding agents on the market.

Here’s a look at five ways super glue has been used that proves just how strong a bonding agent it truly is.

girl-climbing-on-the-rocky-mountain

girl-climbing-on-the-rocky-mountain

 1. The Hanging Car

A radio station had heard about super glues and decided to put them to the test at a local junk yard. Among the super glues tested were many of the National Brands on the market today. The test was to hold a hanging car from a crane. Eastman 910 (commonly known today as super glue) bonded steel which lifted up to 3000 pounds after just 10 seconds. Today’s record for weight held up by super glue is 5000 pounds.

 2. Mountain Free-Climbing

Recently, two Americans completed what has long been considered the world’s most difficult rock climb, using only their hands and feet to conquer a 900m vertical wall on El Capitan, the forbidding granite face in Yosemite National Park that has beckoned adventurers for decades.

Tommy Caldwell and Kevin Jorgeson became the first to free-climb the Dawn Wall, a feat that many had considered impossible. They used ropes and safety harnesses to catch them in case of a fall, but relied on their own strength and dexterity to ascend by grasping cracks as thin as razor blades and as small as coins, which is extremely tough on the fingertips.

When the fingertip callus splits, climbers have devised various remedies that allow them to keep going. Athletic tape (applied in an X-pattern to allow full mobility of the finger joint) can provide enough protection for an injury. More advanced than the X-pattern is the Miami Thong, also known as the British Flag, in which separate strips of tape are applied in layers, first longitudinally, then in a crisscross design.

A common problem with tape is its tendency to slip off the finger. Instead of wrapping the finger more tightly and risking it going numb, climbers often use a strong adhesive such as super glue, applying it directly to the skin before wrapping the digit in tape.

 3. Battlefield Wounds

The use of super glue in medicine was considered early on. Eastman Kodak and Ethicon began studying whether the glue could be used to hold human tissue together for surgery. In 1966, super glue found a use in Vietnam, tested on-site by a specially trained surgical team, with impressive results.

The compound demonstrated an excellent capacity to stop bleeding; so, during the Vietnam War, Dr. Coover developed disposal super glue sprays for use in the battlefield. This spray was used as a way to stop bleeding from an open wound, so that wounded soldiers were able to be transported back to the base hospital.

Super glues are still used in surgeries today to close up wounds and surgical incisions, and can be used as a barrier against common bacterial microbes including certain staphylococci, pseudomonads, and Escherichia coli. Super glues also find use in medicine for orthopedic surgery, dental and oral medicine, veterinary medicine, and for home use as Band Aid brand Liquid Bandage.

 4. Fixing Coral Reefs

Super glue has even proven to be strong underwater, as it can be used to fix coral reefs. While this is a popular trend among people who own aquariums, just imagine the potential that super glue has for fixing damage to coral reefs in the ocean.

To attach coral frags in your aquarium:

  1. Gather your materials—Super Glue adhesive, AquaMend putty, paper towels, and your coral frag.
  2. Find the right location—take into account the flow and lighting the area provides, match that with the requirements of the coral frag.
  3. Trim the frag plug—frags are sold on live rock pieces or on their own. You will need to trim to match the type of aquascape you are looking for.
  4. Mix up a small ball of AquaMend putty—make just enough to fill any holes or areas that are on the live rock you are attaching to.
  5. Apply the adhesive gel to the frag or plug—dab dry the coral with a paper towel. Use the correct amount to make a secure bond for the next step, but try not to add too much that it will ooze onto the coral itself.
  6. Apply the putty ball to the adhesive on the frag—you don’t need to push very hard, just secure it to the glue.
  7. Apply another layer of adhesive to the top of the putty—super glue gel will cure to a wet surface.
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