Japan Using Super Glue Concept To Clean Up Radiation Contamination

April 13, 2011 by Super Glue Corporation Leave a reply »
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According to a CNN article, Japanese scientists are using a super glue like substance (and theory) to clean up radiation contamination.  The article cites Tokyo Electric saying, “Water from the 2-meter-deep, concrete-lined basin has been seen escaping into the ocean through a roughly 20-centimeter (8-inch) crack, the company said earlier Saturday. The shaft lies behind the turbine plant of the No. 2 reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, which was heavily damaged in the earthquake and resulting tsunami last month..  “ 

Apparently using polymers, as a Plan B, to stop the leaks came after attempts to fill the shafts with concrete was failing to contain the radiation filled waters from flowing into the ocean.

The process, according to the CNN article, involves the following:

“Crews have dispersed about 2,000 liters (more than 500 gallons) of synthetic resin in a 500-square-meter locale, according to Tokyo Electric. The aim is to hold the released radioactivity on the ground, so it can’t interfere with the restoration of the cooling systems aimed at preventing the overheating of nuclear fuel rods in reactors and spent fuel pools at the plant.

‘You spray it to hold down the loose contamination, and it acts like a super glue,’ said Nolan Hertel, a radiation engineering expert at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. ‘You don’t want radioactive materials that are loose to get away.’ “

Experts from around the world are working tirelessly, applying scientific knowledge and immense creativity, to minimize fallout after the 9.0 magnitude earthquake, and subsequent tsunami, hit the area on, March 11, 2011 according to the New York Times and Scientific American.

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